Let’s put an end to overdone buzzwords

By Bikram Vohra

Just like there are expiry dates on cars and canned goods, there should be the same for words and phrases made threadbare with overuse. Something like a ‘use by…’ shelf life. Remember when every second person was ‘thinking out of the box’? One more guy said that at an office meeting and you wanted to smack him. Stop it, now. What box, like we were all confined to some verbal gaol and the key had been flung away. You are not thinking until it is out of the box. Continue reading Let’s put an end to overdone buzzwords

What the Twitter part of our brain likes, and other stories

By Anamika Chatterjee

How does one define ‘modern Muslim identity’ without boxing it into lazy stereotypes? One of the more poignant books on the issue was British Pakistani writer Kamila Shamsie’s Home Fire, which was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize last year. Come March, and Shamsie will be in town to be part of the Emirates Airline Festival of Literature. Ahead of her appearance, Shamsie speaks to us about the need to address political anger in modern literature. Continue reading What the Twitter part of our brain likes, and other stories

Katharine Graham, the woman who had “the guts of a burglar”

By Nivriti Butalia

When my mother, in Delhi, pinged to say ‘they’ (father in tow) were going to watch The Post, I immediately replied, barely reining in my low-stakes triumph: saw it already! It hadn’t crossed my mind that my parents, hardly avid movie-goers, would want to watch The Post. But she asked me, was it good, and I said, I don’t know if it will bore you, but Meryl Streep is fab. Mother told me she saw “the one in which she plays Margaret Thatcher thrice” (I haven’t watched The Iron Lady). Continue reading Katharine Graham, the woman who had “the guts of a burglar”

A single day in Lviv turned out to be a kind of homecoming

By Keith Pereña

It has been three months, two weeks and six days since I took a six-hour train ride to Lviv — a city in the western part of Ukraine. I’m writing this now in my house in Dubai, all while browsing through photos of the one day that I was in that city. There are little reminders of it everywhere — a bar of chocolate from the city’s famous chocolate factory sits inside the fridge, the train ticket from Kyiv to Lviv is plastered inside my journal, and every now and then, a message from one of the souls I met there pops up on my phone. Continue reading A single day in Lviv turned out to be a kind of homecoming

What colour is your passport? I dream of gold!

By Suresh Pattali

In college we all learnt colour doesn’t exist, except in your mind. So ask me what’s on my mind. The colour orange. Forgive me if I sound smug. Last night, when social media was still red hot with the news of India’s ‘passport reform,’ I had a serendipitous dream. Forget the Big Ticket and Millennium Millionaire. The colour orange made me truly affluent. It wasn’t a raffle. I earned the riches. Curious? Then accompany me as I revisit my wild dream. Continue reading What colour is your passport? I dream of gold!