When a classic bike connects generation

By Allan Jacob

What happens when nostalgia comes riding on a motorbike? I would succumb to the sheer emotion, the joy on wheels, the pleasure of the ride. So when a legendary bike named Jawa was relaunched last week in India, the occasion kick-started some feelings in me and off I went to share my excitement with those who experienced it, like I did in my boyhood. I didn’t have to go far as our sports editor in the newsroom cheerfully said he owned one during his stint as a rookie reporter during his salad days in Bombay, or Mumbai, in circa 1979.

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Dastangoi keeps the art of oral storytelling alive

By Anamika Chatterjee

Who was it who said that a good story is one that holds a mirror to our collective conscience? That may provide an inroad into the world of dastangoi. An ancient storytelling form in Urdu, it has lately acquired a niche for its incisive takes on society and politics. Be it sedition or Partition, performers have taken on inconvenient truths of our time and made them more accessible to a wider audience.

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At present, we are Back to the Future

By Alvin R. Cabral

To paraphrase a quote I heard from a gentleman whom I overheard during an event this week: “Before, smart-phone makers were saying it was all about size, features and security. Now, they’re telling us that it’s all about the number of cameras.”

And, to quote yours truly: “Nuts.”

When dual-lens camera systems on smartphones entered the market, it was, to a certain extent, hailed or ripped: one faction said it’s innovation; the other side said what’s it for, an extra hit on your pocket? Continue reading At present, we are Back to the Future

When a friend I haven’t met calls

By Suresh Pattali

Once upon a time, I called myself Chaotic Soul. And my first virtual home was aptly named so to define my persona truthfully. The only constant in my life was chaos. Life was meaningless without a minimum amount of mess, whether my own or borrowed. In most cases, I did not create them. Chaos came to me, like a moth to a flame. I lived in my virtual cocoon that had a signboard forewarning prospective visitors, “Come in carefully. Do not trip over carcasses of chaos.” Continue reading When a friend I haven’t met calls

Ideas adman Alyque will be dearly missed

By Aresh Shirali

In advertising circles, and especially in the ad agency Lintas that he led, Alyque Padamsee, who died on November 17 in Mumbai, was called “God”. An accident of recruitment — or mistaken roles, rather — as he once explained in his inimitably theatric voice: at Lintas, he also had a secretary by the name of Pope and the rest of the office knew only too well that to get access to him, they had to consult the Pope Continue reading Ideas adman Alyque will be dearly missed

Why I love browsing in a real bookshop over a virtual one

By Enid Grace Parker

In the present day, do we really need to go to a store to buy what we need/want? Most of the time, we don’t. With just a couple of clicks on a computer (or a phone), your purchases will start making their way to your doorstep. No extracting the car from that precious parking spot just to head to the mall, no taking a train or bus or taxi, no banter with salespeople, no standing in queues at the checkout counter. Ah, the easy life.

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What a horror show taught me about the modern family

By Anamika Chatterjee

One of my earliest memories of watching a horror film is with my mother. In my formative years, she would keep my eyes and ears covered through the shrieks and gore. Sights and sounds aside, the idea of a vengeful spirit had already entered my 12-year-old precocious mind and was to be seated there for a long time.

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