All posts by Keith Perena

Two men became Hasan’s eyes as he ran 10k at Dubai Marathon, blind

By James Gibb

There are many things we take for granted when we lace up our shoes to run. Being able to feel the ground beneath our feet; being able to hear the gentle roll of the ocean or grind of the city; being able to smell the freshly cut summer grass; and being able to see the world in front of us. Think about that last one for a moment. Being able to actually see where you’re running. If you’ve ever tried running with your eyes closed or with a blindfold — even just for a few seconds — it feels impossible. Yet for many, loss of vision has been a challenge they’ve had to overcome, greater than any marathon.   

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We south Asians should be proud of our in-demand hair

By Sarwat Nasir

If there was only one physical feature of myself that I would have to choose as my crowning glory, it would be my hair.

Don’t brush me off as another self-centred, selfie-obsessed 20-something-year-old brat. I have good reason to believe why most south Asians — Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis — really do have naturally thick, glossy hair. With the right amount of flat ironing, hair serum and styling, we are usually able to achieve perfection.

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Hunting for someone to marry just doesn’t ‘ad’ up

By Sushmita Bose

As an Indian, I cringe a little when the subject of “arranged marriages” crop up among my non-desi friends. “So the man and woman are not allowed to choose their life partners? A life partner needs to be deemed “suitable” by others first?” is one question posed, even as I desperately (and not very successfully) try to reinforce the notion that a lot of Indians actually don’t have to stomp down the arranged marriage route, and are free to make their own life choices.

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Ask women about work, not when they’re getting married

By Sherouk Zakaria

On New Year’s Day, my grandmother, who flew in to spend the holidays with us, gave me a warm hug and said, “Happy New Year, darling. I hope to see you in your own house next year.” She didn’t mean getting my own place when I fly abroad to get my master’s degree or when I get a job with a pay decent enough to allow me to buy a house. She was referring to the house I would move into as a result of marriage.

Continue reading Ask women about work, not when they’re getting married