Category Archives: Movies

Watching a Jurassic Park flick 25 years after the first one

By Lujein Farhat

Dinosaurs are the awe-inspiring behemoths of my childhood. I remember sliding the Jurassic Park VHS tape out of its sleeve, after swearing my three little brothers to secrecy, before popping it into the VCR for a clandestine movie night. Funny how nearly 25 years later, my not-so-little brothers and I went to the late-night premiere of the latest instalment in the series, Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom. One of my brothers is such a fan that his email signature is still Dr Alan Grant!

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How a bad product plug ruins the fun of a movie

By Sushmita Bose

Welcome to the movies, where the hero (or the heroine) will have to be shown getting behind the wheel at some point, or looking at a watch, or speaking on a phone, or having a cuppa at a café, or checking into a hotel, or proposing (or being proposed to) with a ‘designer’ ring etc etc. So brands jump in to offer their wares/services — and, therefore, their products get noticed. Chances are, they assume, “fans” may just turn into potential consumers. Good for a sales kick.

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How the film Vertigo set a dizzying bar exactly 60 years ago

By Sushmita Bose

I’ve often wondered why Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo — that completes its 60th anniversary in a few days (May 9, 1958, was when the film released) was never remade. I’ve always put it down to being too much of a tough act to follow. It’s perhaps Hitchcock’s most complex, nuanced film — yes, even more, much more than Psycho — and definitely his most “sensory” one, and that’s not just because of the vertigo factor. Continue reading How the film Vertigo set a dizzying bar exactly 60 years ago

Why we need to break out of a comfort zone called Disney

By Maán Jalal

Many of us grew up watching Disney animated films. Those classic tales, many of which are based on Grimm’s Fairy Tales or other European folk stories, first established the standard of what to except from a “good” animated film. Disney also became synonymous with innovation, advancing the medium from hand-drawn animation to the computer-generated films we see today. These days, it’s almost unheard of to see an animated movie that is completely hand drawn. No matter how beloved the Disney animated films of the ’90s and even early 2000s were, they are now seen as old-fashioned.

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