Category Archives: Personal

Why to-do lists don’t work for me

By Delilah Rodrigues

The phone beeps. Alarms remind me of tasks I need to accomplish. Little yellow post-its stuck on the walls scream at me – buy veggies, do the laundry, finish editing, call the plumber, go to the gym. Just thinking about things I need to do makes me break into a sweat. My heart starts pounding. Just then, I hear the husband call out to me. Phew! it was just a dream, but a very sticky one I must say.

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What New Year’s resolutions? I’m still binging on Netflix and doughnuts in 2020

By Purva Grover

“So, what’s your New Year’s resolution?” is a question, which is as rude, if not more than, “So, what did you do on New Year’s Eve?” Just when the pressure to party leaves us alone, the pestering to be perfect and bring about a 360-degree turn to our lives takes over. This is the first weekend of 2020 and we’re expected to be seen nowhere else except on a running track or inside of a gym. There is also the compulsion to drink celery, green apple and kale juice each morning; to detox after all the festive food. By next week, of course, the expectations will wear [us] down and we’ll be back to using the elevator. So far, so good. Hashtags like #healthylifetstyle and #newyearnewme are trending, and will soon enough give way to memes on breaking the resolutions. According to the US News & World Report (January 2019), the failure rate for New Year’s resolutions is said to be about 80 per cent, and most lose their resolve by mid-February.

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What’s broken can be rebuilt. Trust me, it can be so simple

By Anamika Chatterjee

Not many would believe, but there was a time in my life when I wanted to be an economist. Amartya Sen hadn’t won a Nobel then, and Abhijit Banerjee wasn’t even a name I was familiar with. Economics — with its focus on development — seemed to be a subject where human interest and numbers could hope to co-exist in peace. My dreams died a natural death when I was told that I had received a measly 75 per cent in my Class XII Board exams. In other words, I would not be deemed good enough to study economics in any good college in University of Delhi.

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