Category Archives: Subcontinent

It makes no sense to protest the release of a political movie

By Anamika Chatterjee

It’s not often that one finds that someone penned a book titled The Book I Won’t Be Writing And Other Essays. And yet, H.Y. Sharada Prasad did just that. In the brief introduction, the former media adviser to Indian prime ministers Indira Gandhi and Rajiv Gandhi made a case for not writing the book his peers so badly wanted him to write: an insider’s account of the leader that was Indira Gandhi. He said he lacked “the capacity to do justice to her complexity” — that prevented him from trying.

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The patriarchy they stood up against deserves more walls

By Suresh Pattali

In the beginning, I wasn’t a big fan of the Vanitha Mathil, or Women’s Wall, conceptualised and marshalled by the Left Democratic government and some Hindu organisations in the Indian state of Kerala. The basic premise behind the formation of a human wall on New Year’s day was the consolidation of women’s voices for gender equality. And that’s where I had a problem with the wall.

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They look happy, but be wary of celebrity #weddinggoals

By Anamika Chatterjee

Five years ago, when my partner and I exchanged vows, I was assured it would be the most magical day of our lives. When the fantasy played out in real life, I couldn’t wait for the ‘magic’ to get over. The thought of going ‘over-the-budget’, the pressure of looking half-decent as a bride and the anxiety over more guests showing up than expected (most Delhi-ites don’t believe in RSVP-ing) exhausted me. The nail-biting moments came to an end only five days later when the celebrations were over.

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How this week’s news got me hooked to politics back home

By Sushmita Bose

For the longest time, I’d been disinterested in politics — of the political kind. As an Indian, and as a Bengali (apparently, Bengali political sensibilities are more evolved than average, and every discussion among a group of people from my home state invariably devolves into a raging ideological debate — based on who is in power), I was quite the outlier. My job as a journalist (when I was in India) obviously meant I couldn’t be ignorant; but personally and emotively, I couldn’t care less (unless I liked a particular politician — like, say, Sachin Pilot, who used to be one of my nicest contacts, and someone I want great things to happen to because he’s just so deserving).

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Why Vijay Mallya makes my blood boil

By Allan Jacob

Striking a man when he is down is not my style in these divisive times when everything one says is dissected and damned. However, I find it hard to put a lid on the anger welling inside in me as Indian billionaires, or Bollygarchs, as author and journalist James Crabtree calls them, go unpunished and taunt the law from distant shores.

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